very ugg Cosy pile of blankets

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Inspired by Moroccan mosaic tile work patterns the Sferra Burke throws at Atkinson’s of Vancouver are made from 100 per cent cotton and will add elegance and warmth to any room and person in it. Atkinson’s of Vancouver $121

Blocks of grey and cream in this alpaca and lambs wool throw by Ontario’s Linen Way offers a modern take on the current checked craze that all over fashion and home decor this fall. Made from sustainable, renewable and recyclable fibres and being both lightweight and warm it works downtown and at the cabin. Provide Home $155

Strong colours add warmth to any room and Ikea’s designers are known from presenting them in such simple designs they achieve the perfect temperature. The Henrika throw in dark orange will liven things up, draped over any couch, chair or person. Ikea $19.99

The Icelandic Sheepskins at Gastown’s Litchfield are so plush and soft you be forgiven for disappearing into one, on the couch or floor, and never resurfacing. These sheep are sustainably raised in Canada and the sheepskins are available in white, salt and peppered grey and spotted. Litchfield From $298. Clever graphics featuring cabins, mountains and animals will bring the outdoors in and being heavyweight, with a double knit design, it’ll work outside too. Vancouver Special $99

Getting snug doesn’t have to look like UGG boots and track pants. The range of fantastic throws, blankets and sheepskins out there right now can transform your home into a cosy place of refuge and there’ll be no need for a costume change should company swing by.

Vancouver Special $99

Layers of class

Inspired by Moroccan mosaic tile work patterns the Sferra Burke throws at Atkinson’s of Vancouver are made from 100 per cent cotton and will add elegance and warmth to any room and person in it.

Atkinson’s of Vancouver $121The Icelandic Sheepskins at Gastown’s Litchfield are so plush and soft you’ll be forgiven for disappearing into one, on the couch or floor, and never resurfacing. These sheep are sustainably raised in Canada and the sheepskins are available in white, salt and peppered grey and spotted.

Litchfield From $298

Block party

Blocks of grey and cream in this alpaca and lambs wool throw by Ontario’s Linen Way offers a modern take on the current checked craze that’s all over fashion and home decor this fall. Made from sustainable,
very ugg Cosy pile of blankets
renewable and recyclable fibres and being both lightweight and warm it works downtown and at the cabin.

Provide Home $155

Going bush

During the chilly months hike the trails from the comfort of your couch with this Deep Forest Blanket in night blue by Vancouver’s Forest Waves. Clever graphics featuring cabins, mountains and animals will bring the outdoors in and being heavyweight, with a double knit design, it’ll work outside too.

Burning up

Strong colours add warmth to any room and Ikea’s designers are known from presenting them in such simple designs they achieve the perfect temperature. The Henrika throw in dark orange will liven things up, draped over any couch, chair or person.

Ikea $19.99

The NRC re imagines itself, with the help of a bigger budgetThe no longer new president of the National Research Council has just been told by the federal budget to his agency, but it turns out he been doing this for a year and a half. Prosecutors had 30 days following the Feb. 9 verdict to file an appeal in the case. government shatters Ottawa woman’s professional life, then quietly recants allegationsMarie Boivin was sitting at a Starbucks a year and a half ago when she got a call from her accountant. said to me, have to turn on CNN,’ she recalled. bad. Building Trades they will be guaranteed a .

Douglas Todd: Why Sikhs are so powerful in Canadian politicsThe Sikh connection had been working well for Justin Trudeau, as it did for Jean Chretien. Punjabi Canadians.

Daphne Bramham: Convicted polygamist Winston Blackmore unrepentant even as he faces possible jail timeCRANBROOK Expect to hear more, not less, from Winston Blackmore now that his conviction for polygamy.

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very ugg Cosy pile of blankets

very ugg Too many classic films remain buried in studios vaults

ugg flipflops Too many classic films remain buried in studios vaults

“The Wild Party” (1929), the first talkie to star 1920’s “It” girl Clara Bow, second from left in the first row, was directed by the pioneering female director Dorothy Arzner. Produced by Paramount Studios, it is among 700 titles assumed to be nestled in the vaults of Universal Pictures, which inherited Paramount’s 1930s and 1940s film archive from its forebear MCA, which acquired the collection in 1958.

“The Wild Party” (1929), the first talkie to star 1920’s “It” girl Clara Bow, second from left in the first row, was directed by the pioneering female director Dorothy Arzner. Produced by Paramount Studios, it is among 700 titles assumed to be nestled in the vaults of Universal Pictures, which inherited Paramount’s 1930s and 1940s film archive from its forebear MCA, which acquired the collection in 1958. For classic film blogger Nora Fiore, the Grail might be “The Wild Party” (1929), the first talkie to star 1920’s “It” girl Clara Bow, directed by the pioneering female director Dorothy Arzner. Film critic Leonard Maltin says he’d like to score a viewing of “Hotel Haywire,” a 1937 screwball comedy written by the great comic director Preston Sturges.

Produced by Paramount Studios, these are all among 700 titles assumed to be nestled in the vaults of Universal Pictures, which inherited Paramount’s 1930s and 1940s film archive from its forebear MCA, which acquired the collection in 1958. They’re frustratingly near at hand but out of reach of film fans and cinephiles.

Like most of the other major studios, Universal is grappling with the challenging economics of making more of this hoard accessible to the public on DVD, video on demand or streaming video. Studios have come to realize that there’s not only marketable value in the films, but publicity value in performing as responsible stewards of cultural assets.

I would have to break the law to see that film.

Cinephile Nora Fiore, of a 1932 classic locked in a studio vault

No studio recognizes these values better than Warner Bros., whose Warner Archives division is the industry gold standard in the care and marketing of the past. The studio sells some 2,300 titles, including TV series, as made to order DVDs and offers its own archival video streaming service for a subscription fee of up to $9.99 a month.

The manufacturing on demand service, launched in March 2009 with 150 titles, has proved “far more successful than we even dreamed,” says George Feltenstein, a veteran home video executive who heads the division. “I thought that all the studios would follow in our footsteps, but nobody has been as comprehensive as we’ve been.”

Other major studios have dipped their toes into this market, if gingerly. Paramount last year stocked a free YouTube channel with 91 of its own titles, mostly post 1949. This month 20th Century Fox announced that as part of its 100th anniversary this year, it would release 100 remastered classic films, including silents, to buy or rent for high definition streaming “enough to make any classic film fan weep with joy,” McKinley wrote on his blog.

Universal offers some manufacture on demand titles via Amazon as its Universal Vault Series and announced in May that it would restore 15 of its silent films as part of its 2012 centennial celebration. Curiously, Universal, owned by the cable giant Comcast, is one of the only majors without a dedicated cable channel or Internet streaming service for its archive. Universal spokesperson Cindy Gardner maintains that the studio is working on ways to improve: “Stay tuned.”

Film buffs and historians have easier access to more classic films than ever before. But that only whets their appetite for important but perhaps forgotten films.

The 1932 Paramount World War I drama “Broken Lullaby,” Fiore says, might provoke a reexamination of the career of its director, the master of graceful comedy Ernst Lubitsch. But a version that crept onto YouTube a few years ago was taken down at the insistence of Universal. “I would have to break the law to see that film,” laments Fiore, who blogs on classic films in the guise of the Nitrate Diva.

“The studios seem to be sitting on a lot of films, but they’re limited by budget and by their projected return on investment,” says Alan Rode, a director of the Film Noir Foundation. “But it’s not like you open a valve and films come gushing out. If they can’t realize a profit on it, they’re not going to do it.”

Adding to the challenge is that some of the major studios have become subsidiaries of large corporations, and not consistently huge profit centers. For example, Paramount last year contributed about 26% of the $13.8 billion in revenue of its parent, Viacom, but its $205 million in operating profit paled next to the $2.4 billion net income recorded by the whole corporation.

Converting a film title for digital release can be costly, especially under the watchful eye of cinephiles who demand high quality. after only the Library of Congress.

But the price rises exponentially for color, especially for important restoration. UCLA spent about three years and $1.5 million in donated funds on its heroic restoration and digital transfer of the Technicolor classic “The Red Shoes,” a 1948 backstage ballet drama revered for its beauty.

That means that when deciding which titles to prepare for digital release, archive managers must walk a tightrope between serving their audience and protecting the bottom line. Some classics are easy calls. “There always will be a place on the retail shelf for ‘Casablanca,’ ‘King Kong’ or ‘Citizen Kane,'” says Warner’s Feltenstein. But finer judgments are required for what Feltenstein calls “the deeper part of the library.”

“My job is to monetize that content, make it available to the largest number of people possible and do so profitably,” Feltenstein told me. To gauge demand, Feltenstein’s staff keeps lines open with film enthusiasts and historians via Facebook, Twitter, a free weekly podcast and other outreach. “They literally ask us, ‘What do you want to see?'” Fiore says.

That gives them a window into values that others might miss. Take B movie westerns made in the 1940s and 1950s that landed in the Warners vault. To Allied Artists and Lorimar, their producers, “these films were worthless and they said it’s OK to let them rot,” Feltenstein says. Instead, Warner Archives packaged them into DVD collections, “and they’ve all been nicely profitable.”

Feltenstein says Warners is releasing 30 more titles to its manufacturing on demand library every month. “It’s growing precipitously and there’s no end in sight.” Universal’s Gardner says there’s “real momentum” at her studio behind “making our titles more available than ever before.”

But there’s always more beckoning over the horizon. “The good news is that every studio is actively engaged in taking care of its library,” Maltin says. “That’s a big improvement over 20 or 25 years ago. But access is the final frontier.”

[UPDATE: Nell Minow, whose excellent blog on film can be found at Movie Mom and who is a fan of “Alias Nick Beal,” reports that the title character, played by Ray Milland, is more than merely a “satanic gangster” as we describe him above he’s Satan.]
very ugg Too many classic films remain buried in studios vaults